BEST AZW "½ Letters Home from The Crimea: A Young Cavalryman's Campaign" || UNLIMITED (EPUB) ↠ #2020


  • Title: Letters Home from The Crimea: A Young Cavalryman's Campaign
  • Author: Philip Warner
  • ISBN: 9781900624244
  • Page: 498
  • Format: Paperback

  • Letters Home from The Crimea: A Young Cavalryman's Campaign By Philip Warner Among the British troops bound for the Black Sea in May 1854 was a young officer in the 5th Dragoon Guards, Richard Temple Godman Godman sent many detailed letters home to his family in Surrey throughout the campaign He served through the entire war, and took part in the Charge of the Heavy Brigade at Balaklava, not returning to England until June, 1856.Fresh and easy toAmong the British troops bound for the Black Sea in May 1854 was a young officer in the 5th Dragoon Guards, Richard Temple Godman Godman sent many detailed letters home to his family in Surrey throughout the campaign He served through the entire war, and took part in the Charge of the Heavy Brigade at Balaklava, not returning to England until June, 1856.Fresh and easy to read, Godman s letters provide an un rivaled picture of what it was really like to be in the Crimea His dispatches from the fields of war reveal his wide interests and varied experiences, including riding, hunting, and smoking Turkish tobacco He also recorded the heavy casualties, among both men and horses, caused by battle, disease, deprivation and lack of medicines He also wrote scathingly about military rivalry at the top, inaccurate newspaper reporting, and well bred female volunteers in the hospitals.
    Philip Warner
    Philip Warner was an outstanding military historian, and for the last 13 years The Daily Telegraph s peerless Army obituarist Indeed, he played a vital role in setting the standard for the modern Telegraph obituary He had a relish for the piquant detail and an understanding that a good story should never be overdressed.He was a master of the laconic, lapidary phrase Warner s direct, uncluttered and transparent prose, was a reflection of the man Above all, he felt deep admiration for the lives he celebrated His own character, always strong, had been tempered by his terrible experiences at the hands of the Japanese during the Second World War.One of the Allied soldiers rounded up and imprisoned after the fall of Singapore on February 15 1942, he spent some time in the infamous Changi jail, and worked on the Railway of Death For every sleeper laid on the 1,000 miles of track through Malaya, Burma and Thailand, a prisoner of war was lost Philip Warner was saved by his tough mindedness and by his belief in the virtues of loyalty To help his fellow prisoners forget their troubles, he organised plays, talks and debates.Afterwards, he never liked to mention his ordeal He felt he owed his survival to his physical condition he performed 30 minutes of exercises every day of his life , his scrupulous hygiene hard to stick to when one is starving , and to his strong sense of belonging to his family back in Britain At night he would look at the moon, and think of it passing over Warwickshire.In 1944 Warner and other able bodied PoWs were stowed under deck in a troopship he enjoyed the irony of being almost torpedoed by the Americans , and taken to Japan, where he worked in the copper mines, in dark, hot and dangerous conditions.As the Americans closed in, he and his fellow PoWs had the unnerving experience of being herded into caves, while the Japanese guards set up machine guns outside The atom bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki probably saved the prisoners from massacre.At the beginning of the war Warner had weighed 14 stone in 1945 he was 4.5 stone In 1,100 days of captivity, he only received half a Red Cross parcel He was never among those inclined to bestow easy forgiveness upon the Japanese The maltreatment which he had endured increased his natural reticence Although he set great store by loyalty, he gave his trust warily.Once certain that he could rely on someone, he would do anything for them should anyone abuse his trust, he was slow to forgive There are six billion people in the world, he was wont to say, and when this person gets to the top of the pile again, I will give him another chance After the war Warner taught at Sandhurst and became a prolific writer, turning out than 50 books.He would produce two volumes a year, not to mention up to 200 obituaries and many book reviews all with an absolute minimum of fuss He worked on the principle that, once he had covered a page with writing, he could always cross it out He was a firm believer in the virtues of perseverance Stick at the wicket and the runs will come and in early starts One hour in the morning is worth two in the afternoon, is worth three in the evening In the 1970s he was seriously ill, but under his colossal labour he throve as never before Without it, he used to say, he would have had to play golf every day and, useful player though he was, that was not his idea of a tolerable life.Though the last man to preach, Philip Warner set a supreme example of how to tackle old age While eager to enjoy himself, and, still , to see that his friends enjoyed themselves, he instinctively understood that pleasure is best courted against a background of disciplined endeavour.Philip Arthur William Warner was born at Nuneaton on May 19 1914, the last in

    Letters Home from The Crimea: A Young Cavalryman's Campaign By Philip Warner

    Commentaires:

    David
    An intermittently fascinating look at the sporting country gentleman s obsessions when sent to war You think you ve seen entitlement We have much to learn.

    • BEST AZW "½ Letters Home from The Crimea: A Young Cavalryman's Campaign" || UNLIMITED (EPUB) ↠
      498 Philip Warner
    • thumbnail Title: BEST AZW "½ Letters Home from The Crimea: A Young Cavalryman's Campaign" || UNLIMITED (EPUB) ↠
      Posted by:Philip Warner
      Published :2020-05-25T20:24:37+00:00